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Cookies are good for the soul. Remember when mumma or granny gave you a cookie to make you smile (or to shut you up)

 

Afternoon tea or high tea? Who cares as long as there’s tea and biscuits…

Tea and biscuits

If there’s one thing that we love as much as we love biscuits, it has to be tea. Tea and biscuits is the embodiment of the term ‘life’s simple pleasures’.

We get so caught up in the treadmill of no-dairy, no-sugar, no-caffeine that we sometimes forget that just a mindful moment with a cuppa and bickie is all we need.

But where does our love of tea and biscuits come from? Other than the fact that they are…well, bloody nice.

Tea and biscuits…in so many words.

There are many traditions that basically boil down to the same thing. A cup of tea and a little something sweet.

Afternoon tea

The forerunner of them all was probably afternoon tea. Invented by the British upper classes in the early Victorian age, afternoon tea was a light meal designed to stave off hunger in the afternoon as dinner was traditionally served late in the evening. Also known as low tea, it was served on low tables away from the formality of the dining table. A casual, although refined affair, afternoon tea consists of dainty little things served with a pot of tea. Finger sandwiches, scones, and small cakes are all typical of afternoon tea.

High tea

At around the same period, as the Industrial Revolution gathered steam, the working classes were also partaking of tea. High tea was originally a meal taken when coming in from work. Eaten at the table (the only table aka the kitchen table) this was a more substantial meal yet also accompanied by a pot of tea. There would be pie, bread, maybe some cold meat. Perhaps a loaf cake, or some crumpets. Biscuits.

The upper classes thought this was all jolly good fun and so also had their own version of high tea, taken if one was going to the theatre or something and expected a very late supper.

The term high tea is now more likely to be interchangeable with afternoon tea, and taken to mean the classic afternoon tea of tea, sandwiches and scones; usually eaten out, as a treat.

Elevenses

The changes to the working pattern of the world led to changes in the way people eat. An early start meant an early breakfast, and so the concept of a mid morning snack was born. We already understood the restorative power of a cup of tea and a biscuit, and the once expensive tea and sugar were more readily available than ever.

To this day, tea and biscuits means a break. It might be a social affair; a catch up in a cafe with a friend. It may be a solitary pleasure; a moment of me time. Whatever it may be, savour it slowly, enjoy it and appreciate it as millions of workers before you have done. And if you are one of the rare folk who doesn’t like tea…

…well there’s always coffee.

 

Check out our range of premium Australian cookies, and don’t forget you can bulk buy online at our wholesale store.

 

 

The rising demand for gluten-free biscuits and cookies

gluten free biscuits

Are you on board with gluten-free biscuits? Whether you are a cafe, a mum, or a friendly neighbor, sometime, somewhere, it is always time for a cuppa. And who doesn’t like to indulge in a little something sweet.

The demand for gluten-free products is higher than ever, and still rising.

The internet is filled with ideas on how to make the best gluten-free biscuits or recipes for gluten-free chocolate chip cookies but not everybody wants to spend their free time baking. Maybe, you just want to sit in a quiet space with a cup of coffee and a gluten-free treat? Or be able to indulge over a chat with a friend. The more suppliers that get on board and offer gluten-free choices the better. Whether you are a cafe owner, a wholesaler, or a corner shop, offering alternatives can only be a good thing, right?

Why gluten-free?

Gluten is a substance formed from the proteins in wheat. It gives wheat flour the remarkable properties that make it such a versatile ingredient.

Those with coeliac disease cannot tolerate gluten as even the smallest amount triggers an immune response that damages the intestine. With this comes many unpleasant and painful symptoms.

Gluten sensitivity can cause similar symptoms but is triggered by different antibodies. This sensitivity to gluten is often attributed to the changing DNA of modern wheat and its prevalence in the western diet. It cannot be denied that giving up gluten is also a major trend. Many people give up gluten and find that it simply helps them to make food choices that support their personal well being.

Whatever the reasons, the fact remains that more and more people are choosing gluten-free products, including sweet treats such as biscuits and cookies.

Are gluten-free cookies healthy?

Gluten-free cookies should be viewed like any other cookie. As an occasional sweet treat. Gluten-free does not automatically mean healthier, but it can mean more choice for everyone.

Do gluten-free cookies taste different?

We often expect free-from foods to be a replica of the original. But without the properties of gluten this can be difficult to achieve. Different flours behave in different ways and working with them is not always easy. It isn’t so much a question of lowering expectations but rather to keep an open mind. The texture of a gluten-free biscuit may not be exactly as you expect but that doesn’t make it any less delicious. That said, as demand rises, both artisan and commercial bakers are finding better ways to get the best from new ingredients. Sometimes you really cannot tell the difference. There are many people that prefer the gluten-free varieties.

Is xanthan gum gluten-free?

Xanthan gum is gluten-free. Used in baked goods to mimic some of the effects of gluten, it helps dough to hold onto water. Not all products containing xanthan gum will be gluten free, but you will find it in many gluten-free products.

 

Have you tried our gluten-free choc chip cookies yet? Or discover our range of gluten-free wholesale.

How many ways can you make a chocolate biscuit cake?

chocolate biscuit cake

Chocolate biscuit cake, depending on who you ask, ranges from broken up biscuits in a sort of solid ganache (aka fridge cake) to putting biscuit crumb in actual cake batter.

Then there’s a sort of layer cake made from plain biscuits, maybe soaked in a little alcohol, and sandwiched with sweetened cream. As if that weren’t enough, there is the Australian classic – the chocolate ripple biscuit cake.

All of them have a lovely 1950s housewife feel to them. A time when food out of the packets was the new frontier and baking ingenuity knew no bounds.

How to make cake using biscuits

What they all have in common is biscuits. Yay. And chocolate. Unless you feel particularly inventive, in which case you could go beyond chocolate and try different types of biscuits and frostings. This will only really work with the ripple biscuit/layer cake style scenario. Fridge cake wouldn’t be fridge cake without chocolate. It wouldn’t stick together for a start. You could try white chocolate, that could be good.

And they involve no cooking, unless you count a bit of melting or whipping. If that is too much of a stretch for you, then you can just eat biscuits straight from the packet and be done with it…

Broken biscuit cake

Also known as biscuit fridge cake, or tiffin, this is that deliciously moreish wedge of chocolate crammed with bits of biscuit. It manages to be dense and toothsome, yet soft, all at the same time. sometimes it has other things inside too, such as cherries.

How to make cake using biscuits

Basic recipe for chocolate fridge cake using condensed milk

1 can condensed milk

3/4 cup butter

1 cup chocolate chunks

1 pack plain biscuits

  1. Line a tin or any shallow container with greaseproof paper
  2. Break the biscuits into a large bowl
  3. In a small pan over a low heat, melt the butter, condensed milk, and chocolate together.
  4. Mix this into the biscuits.
  5. Press into the tin and chill in the fridge for several hours or until set.

Chocolate ripple biscuit cake

Chocolate ripple cake is the stuff of childhood fantasy. It centered originally around the particular texture (or maybe widespread availability) of the chocolate ripple biscuit. If you feel brave enough to break free of tradition then you could try a triple choc chip cookie. You could dispense with the chocolate altogether, and experiment with anzac biscuits or maybe a coffee cream? Just saying.

If you do feel the need to behave in such an outrageous manner there is only one rule. You have to keep it kitchy cool.

This biscuit cake is made by whipping cream, with a touch of icing sugar and a dash of vanilla, and sandwiching the biscuits together. Do them in groups of four, and lie the stacks on a plate so that the biscuits are horizontal. So that you have the cross section of stripes when you cut into it. Lay three or four stacks in a length so that you have a log shape. Now cover the whole lot with more softly whipped cream. Decorate with broken chocolate biscuits, lollies, or whatever else you fancy.

You could add Baileys or another alcohol to the cream. You do need to be careful when adding liquid/alcohol/vanilla to cream as it may seize. Or just pour a few shots of alcohol over the biscuit stacks.

You could use frosting instead of cream. Or the chocolate mix from the tiffin above. A chocolate glaze is a nice addition. To make a chocolate glaze simply stir a teaspoon of vegetable oil into melted chocolate and pour it on.

Cream cheese and orange biscuit cake

Here’s a nice cream cheese frosting with a bit of orange zest and a little honey. Maybe a touch of cinnamon and these ginger and date biscuits?

Mix 600g cream cheese with 200g soft unsalted butter and 100g of icing sugar. Stir in 2 tbsp honey and the zest of 1 or 2 oranges.

Italian biscuit cake 

biscuit cake

In Italy, of course, they make their fridge cake with style. Not only will it include things like pistachios and candied peel, but is rolled into a sausage shape and tied up with string like an actual salami. It is even called chocolate salami.

Rocky road biscuit cake

Good old rocky road. Not to be messed with, it is simply fridge cake but with mini marshmallows and raisins. Milk chocolate please.

How to store chocolate biscuit cake

Whatever road of biscuit cake you choose to follow, it belongs in the fridge. Where it will live quite happily for 3 days if it has fresh cream or over a week if it does not.

 

How creative can you get with a packet of biscuits? What do you think is the best biscuit for a biscuit cake? Don’t forget to take advantage of wholesale prices at our bulk food store.

 

 

Get creative with your biscuit base for cheesecake and beyond…

biscuit base

The perfect buttery biscuit crumb base is an essential part of a good cheesecake. Also part of many other desserts, it is a great shortcut to have up your sleeve. But you don’t need to stick with boring biscuits. Any biscuit can be used to make a great cheesecake base.

How to make a biscuit base

A classic biscuit crumb base is made from crushed biscuits mixed with melted butter and set in the fridge. It can form just the base of your cheesecake or dessert, or be pressed up the sides to form a crust.

You can get really creative with your base, and not just in terms of the biscuits used. Try piling the butter/crumb mix into the base of glasses and topping with chocolate mousse, or even just custard mixed with lemon curd.

Classic dishes using a crumb base, other than cheesecake, include banoffee pie, key lime pie, and peanut butter pie. You can make mini versions by lining bun tins with the biscuit crumb mixture. Not so classic ways to use a biscuit crumb base include lemon meringue pie with a biscuit base instead of pastry, or a lemon tart with biscuit base, or even a chocolate tart. Any dessert you can think of that uses a blind baked pastry base is a prime candidate for a buttery biscuit base.

biscuit base recipe

What are the best biscuits for a cheesecake base?

As long as they are crisp biscuits not soft chewy type cookies, you can use any biscuits for your base. A food processor helps with chocolate coated or cream filled biscuits in order to form a nice even crumb. A cream filled biscuit will create a softer sweeter crumb but is well worth experimenting with. Some biscuits will absorb less butter than others, so you may need to play about with proportions.

You could try…

Anzac biscuits

Ginger macadamia

Or even a passion fruit cream.

Make a gluten free biscuit crumb base with our gluten free chocolate chip cookies.

Biscuit base recipe

This will line the base of a 23cm round tin. If you want to press the mixture up the sides, make twice the recipe. 

250g biscuits

125g unsalted butter, melted

  1. Blitz the biscuits in a food processor to a fine crumb. Or, put them in a plastic bag and bash with a rolling pin. Whichever you choose, you want something that looks like damp sand.
  2. Tip the crumb into a bowl. Even if you used a food processor.
  3. Stir the butter into the crumb using a wooden spoon or spatula. You want something that just sticks together.
  4. Press the mixture gently into the tin and set in the fridge for half an hour before filling.
  5. You can pile the crumb loosely onto a baking tray and set without pressing to form a crumble.

Can I make a vegan biscuit base?

You can make a vegan biscuit base as long as your biscuits are vegan and contain no animal products. Just switch out the butter for coconut oil or a plant-based butter. Choose a hard block butter, not a soft spreadable one.

Why is my cheesecake biscuit base too crumbly?

If your biscuit base is too crumbly, you may not have created a fine even crumb, or you may need more butter.

You may not have pressed hard enough when lining the tin.

However a base that is crumbly is infinitely preferable to one that is too hard.

If your biscuity base is too hard then you may have over mixed, which can often result if you blend the butter and the crumb together in a food processor. Too much butter can lead to a mixture that sets too hard – if your crumb mixture looks wet or greasy then you have too much butter. You may also just have pressed too hard when lining the tin.

 

Check out our range of all Australian cookies or buy your biscuits in bulk online.

 

Australian Traditional Anzac Biscuits a Great All Rounder

Well we can still have an Anzac Biscuit. We probable cant march this year on Anzac Day due to the important  Covid-19 Virus restrictions, but we can still celebrate the heroic deeds of those who served. Buy Bush Cookies’ Anzac Biscuits for your family at your local IGA or order online direct from Bush Cookies.

Bush Cookies a Manufacturer of wholesale cookies in Australia makes a Great Anzac Biscuit. Bush Cookies provides a high quality “High Tea” gourmet cookies and biscuits. We supply great wholesale cookies in Sydney, Brisbane and Melbourne. Bush Cookies also delivers these wholesale cookies online direct in different suburbs of Australia.

Anzac Biscuits are Australian traditional oaten biscuit that is perfect as an all-rounder. Anzac Biscuits by Bush Cookies are handmade gourmet biscuits that you will adore in every moment. These gourmet cookies are ideal for morning tea. You can also enjoy with coffee as an alternative. These biscuits may remind of your grandmother who probably used to make these types of cookies.

For more information, visit our site. Book your favorite bulk biscuits now at parent company operafoods.com.au and get an online discount for volume on these products with home delivery.

Mini Freckle Bickies Kids Lunch and Snack Pack Ideas

Mini Freckle Bickies by Bush Cookies are yummy gourmet cookies that kids love. These are ideal for kid’s snack food and kid’s party ideas. Our colorful Freckle Bickies are quite a favorite among children and the mini sized version comes with smaller cookies in an ideal 150 gram pack for the lunch box or snack pack.

They are quite ideal for handy travel and days out. Little people do just love Mini Freckle Bickies. They are a delightful, small package of smaller size cookies perfect for a day out or for reducing kids biscuit consumption.

Mini Freckle Bickies 150g is also popular among our quality range of wholesale cookies and biscuits of Bush Cookies for retailers.

The most appealing aspect of these cookies is that they are loaded with colourful Mini M & Ms. The smaller size candy coated chocolate buttons from, Mars Confectionery.

Visit the Bush Cookies online store to know more details about the product. Through our distributors Bush Cookies supply packaged gourmet cookies to independent grocers and fresh food retailers in Melbourne, Brisbane and Sydney.  Consumers can also buy their favourite products online direct now and get online bulk discounts on this product.

Salted Caramel Cream Ideal for Afternoon Tea and Social Gatherings

The Bush Cookies brand produce great cookies and salted caramel cream is very popular among them in Australia. Bush Cookies have been established a long time. It is the manufacturer as well as the wholesale suppliers of bulk biscuits to the retailers and independent groceries of Australia. Our Salted caramel cream is one as the crunchiest caramel cream-filled biscuit and is an ideal snack for afternoon tea as well as other social gatherings.

The Salted caramel cream is a yummy handmade gourmet biscuit. Ingredients include sugar, margarine, flour, egg, cocoa powder, caramel, golden syrup, vegetable fat, soy, lecithin, syrup, salt, caramel flavor. It helps to keep your mood healthy and cookies fill that hunger pang that just maybe needs something sweet.

Bush Cookies are one of the best wholesale cookies brands in Australia. Visit our Online Store to order your favorite cookies and bickies and get it delivered directly to your home.

Salted Caramel Cream really is ideal ideal for afternoon tea and any kind of social gatherings

Siena Foods New Queensland Distributor for Bush Cookies

Bush Cookies - Display stand

Bush Cookies have announced the establishment of Siena Foods Pty Limited as their new distributor for the Bush Cookies biscuit range in Queensland.

Siena Foods is a long-established SA wholesale food distributor, manufacturer and importer owned and operated by the Mercuri family.

Originally commenced in Adelaide, Siena Foods have expanded to Brisbane now also distribute gourmet and grocery food and also non-food lines, to major supermarket chains, across metropolitan and regional areas of Brisbane and Queensland.

Bush Cookies, a division of the Opera Foods group are proud to be associated with this company that has built a highly respectable reputation in the markets it services.

The Bush Cookies range comprises packaged cookies purpose designed for independent supermarket retailers delicatessens and greengrocers.

Queensland retailers are invited to contact distributors Siena Foods direct for supply of our high-quality packaged biscuits.

Siena Foods Queensland Branch: –

14/65 Christensen Road, Stapylton QLD, 4207
Ph – +61 7 3050 5920 or Fax – +61 7 3041 5029
Hours – Mon to Fri 8am to 4pm

 


This Article was reprinted with permission from an article “Siena Foods New QLD Distributor for Bush Cookies” by Opera Foods.

Anzac Biscuits are Ideal for Morning and Evening Ideas

Bush Cookies make tasty and superior Anzac Biscuits. These Anzac biscuits are perfect for morning and evening tea ideas. Anzac biscuits will remind people of the days of grandmothers handmade biscuits. These Anzac biscuits are Australian traditional oaten biscuits which are round in shape. The name of Anzac biscuits is quite common with the traditional Australian oaten biscuits.

This kind of biscuits are similar to hard tack biscuits utilized by the Anzac soldiers during World War I. But they are more like the kind families home baked and sent to the soldiers. These style of  biscuits were always used to make long-life dry rations for the soldiers and sailors. Earlier it was termed as Dhourra Cake by the Egyptian mariners and the Roman people used to term as buccellum in the regions of Roman. It was the British royal navy who first used to mass produce this kind of hardtack bulk biscuits. Anzac biscuits are a modern version of plain hardtack biscuits.

Australian Anzac biscuits are simple and sweet. The main ingredients of Anzac biscuits are sugar, brown sugar, water, golden syrup, milk solids, butter, wheat flour, and baking soda, rolled oats, coconut and many more.

Opera Foods distribute our Bush Cookies brand packaged for independent grocers. Buy Anzac wholesale biscuits now and avail our online discounts on this product.

Butter Shortbread Cookies are Perfect for Morning Tea or Afternoon Tea

Bush Cookies produce great cookies and Butter Shortbread cookies are very much popular among them. Their nice simple taste that isd  buttery and crunchy makes them an excellent snack with a cup of tea.. Butter shortbread cookies are palatable simple shortbread cookies. Butter shortbread cookies are an ideal crunch for morning and afternoon tea. These cookies are perfect for wedding ceremony, anniversaries and any kind of social gatherings. The ingredients of butter shortbread cookies aresimply  flour, icing sugar, milk, wheaten corn flour, wheat starch, butter and more.

These are handmade wholesale cookies in Australia. Butter shortbread cookies will remind of wonderful that old fashioned butter cookies which is used to available in tins during Christmas time. Shortbread recipes were initially imported NSW Australia, but it gradually became popular in different parts of the countries among outback cooks for their simplicity. Our butter shortbread cookies are generally of round shapes.

Bush Cookies are producers of Café Biscuits wholesale. Retailers can contact our parent Company, Opera Foods to order in bulk. We provide unique brands of fresh packaged biscuits & cookies at an affordable price for independent grocers.